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Meniscus tears - aftercare

Knee cartilage tear - aftercare

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Meniscal tears

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Description

The meniscus is a c-shaped piece of cartilage in your knee joint. You have two in each knee.

More About Your Injury

The meniscus forms a cushion between the bones in your knee to protect the joint. The meniscus:

A meniscus tear can occur if you:

As you get older, your meniscus ages too, and it can become easier to injure.

What to Expect

You may feel a "pop" when a meniscus injury occurs. You also may have:

After examining your knee, the doctor may order these imaging tests:

If you have a meniscus tear, you may need:

Treatment may depend on your age, activity level, and where the tear occurs. For mild tears, you may be able to treat the injury with rest and self-care.

For other types of tears, or if you are younger in age, you may need knee arthroscopy (surgery) to repair or trim the meniscus. In this type of surgery, small cuts are made to the knee. A small camera and small surgical tools are inserted to repair the tear.

A meniscus transplant may be needed if the meniscus tear is so severe that all or nearly all of the meniscus cartilage is torn or has to be removed. The new meniscus can help with knee pain and possibly prevent future arthritis.

Self-care at Home

Follow R.I.C.E. to help reduce pain and swelling:

You can use ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), or naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn) to reduce pain and swelling. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) helps with pain, but not with swelling. You can buy these pain medicines at the store.

Activity

You should not put all of your weight on your leg if it hurts or if your doctor tells you not to. Rest and self-care may be enough to allow the tear to heal. You may need to use crutches.

Afterward, you will learn exercises to make the muscles, ligaments, and tendons around your knee stronger and more flexible.

If you have surgery, you may need physical therapy to regain the full use of your knee. Recovery can take a few weeks to a few months. Under your doctor's guidance, you should be able to do the same activities you did before.

When to Call the Doctor

Call your health care provider if:

If you have surgery, call your surgeon if you have:

References

Lento P, Marshall B, Akuthota V. Meniscal injuries. In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD Jr, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2019:chap 72.

Phillips BB, Mihalko MJ. Arthroscopy of the lower extremity. In: Azar FM, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics. 14th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2021:chap 51.

Ruzbarsky JJ, Maak TG, Rodeo SA. Meniscal injuries. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee, Drez, & Miller's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 94.

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Review Date: 6/13/2021  

Reviewed By: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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