Site Map

Vaginitis - self-care

Vulvovaginitis - self-care; Yeast infections - vaginitis

I Would Like to Learn About:

Description

Vaginitis is a swelling or infection of the vulva and vagina. It may also be called vulvovaginitis.

Vaginitis is a common problem that can affect women and girls of all ages. It can be caused by:

Self-care for Vaginitis

Keep your genital area clean and dry when you have vaginitis.

Avoid douching. Douching may worsen vaginitis symptoms because it removes healthy bacteria that line the vagina. These bacteria help protect against infection.

Allow more air to reach your genital area.

Girls and women should also:

Always practice safe sex. And use condoms to avoid catching or spreading infections.

Treating Yeast Infections

Creams or suppositories are used to treat yeast infections in the vagina. You can buy most of them without a prescription at drug stores, some grocery stores, and other stores.

Treating yourself at home is probably safe if:

Follow the directions that came with the medicine you are using.

Some medicine to treat yeast infections is used for only 1 day. If you do not get yeast infections often, a 1-day medicine might work for you.

Your health care provider can also prescribe a medicine called fluconazole. This medicine is a pill that you take once by mouth.

For more severe symptoms, you may need to use the yeast medicine for up to 14 days. If you have yeast infections often, your provider may suggest using medicine for yeast infections every week to prevent infections.

If you are taking antibiotics for another infection, eating yogurt with live cultures or taking Lactobacillus acidophilus supplements may help prevent a yeast infection.

When to Call the Doctor

Call your provider if:

References

Braverman PK. Urethritis, vulvovaginitis, and cervicitis. In: Long SS, Prober CG, Fischer M, eds. Principles and Practice of Pediatric Infectious Diseases. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 51.

Gardella C, Eckert LO, Lentz GM. Genital tract infections: vulva, vagina, cervix, toxic shock syndrome, endometritis, and salpingitis. In: Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Lentz GM, Valea FA, eds. Comprehensive Gynecology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 23.

BACK TO TOP

Review Date: 6/8/2020  

Reviewed By: LaQuita Martinez, MD, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Emory Johns Creek Hospital, Alpharetta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

ADAM Quality Logo

A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, for Health Content Provider (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy, editorial process and privacy policy. A.D.A.M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- 2022 A.D.A.M., a business unit of Ebix, Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

A.D.A.M. content is best viewed in IE9 or above, Firefox and Google Chrome browser.