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Enlarged prostate - after care

BPH - self-care; Benign prostatic hypertrophy - self-care; Benign prostatic hyperplasia - self-care

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BPH

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Description

Your health care provider has told you that you have an enlarged prostate gland. Here are some things to know about your condition.

What to Expect at Home

The prostate is a gland that produces the fluid that carries sperm during ejaculation. It surrounds the tube through which urine passes out of the body (the urethra).

An enlarged prostate means the gland has grown bigger. As the gland grows, it can block the urethra and cause problems, such as:

Lifestyle Changes

The following changes may help you control symptoms:

Medicines, Herbs, and Supplements

Your health care provider may have you take a medicine called alpha-1- blocker. Most people find that these drugs help their symptoms. Symptoms often get better soon after starting on the medicine. You must take this medicine every day. There are several medicines in this category, including terazosin (Hytrin), doxazosin (Cardura), tamsulosin (Flomax), alfusozin (Uroxatrol), and silodosin (Rapaflo).

Other drugs such as finasteride or dutasteride may also be prescribed. These medicines help shrink the prostate over time and help with symptoms.

Watch out for drugs that may make your symptoms worse:

Many herbs and supplements have been tried for treating an enlarged prostate.

When to Call the Doctor

Call your provider right away if you have:

Also call if:

References

Aronson JK. Finasteride. In: Aronson JK, ed. Meyler's Side Effects of Drugs. 16th ed. Waltham, MA: Elsevier; 2016:314-320.

Kaplan SA. Benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatitis. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 26th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 120.

McVary KT, Roehrborn CG, Avins AL, et al. Update on AUA guideline on the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia. J Urol. 2011;185(5):1793-1803. PMID: 21420124 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21420124.

McNicholas TA, Speakman MJ, Kirby RS. Evaluation and nonsurgical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia. In: Wein AJ, Kavoussi LR, Partin AW, Peters CA, eds. Campbell-Walsh Urology. 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 104.

Samarinas M, Gravas S. The relationship between inflammation and LUTS/BPH. In: Morgia G, ed. Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms and Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia. Cambridge, MA: Elsevier Academic Press; 2018:chap 3.

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Review Date: 7/31/2019  

Reviewed By: Sovrin M. Shah, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Urology, The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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