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Gastroesophageal reflux - discharge

Peptic esophagitis - discharge; Reflux esophagitis - discharge; GERD - discharge; Heartburn - chronic - discharge

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a condition in which the stomach contents leak backwards from the stomach into the esophagus (the tube from the mouth to the stomach). This article tells you what you need to do to manage your condition.

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Gastroesophageal reflux disease

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When You're in the Hospital

You have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This is a condition in which food or liquid travels backwards from the stomach into the esophagus (the tube from the mouth to the stomach).

You may have had tests to help diagnose your GERD or complications you have from it.

Self-care

You can make many lifestyle changes to help treat your symptoms. Avoid foods that cause problems for you.

Other lifestyle tips that may make your symptoms better are:

Avoid medicines such as aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), or naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn). Take acetaminophen (Tylenol) to relieve pain. Take any of your medicines with plenty of water. When you start a new medicine, remember to ask if it will make your heartburn worse.

Try these tips before going to sleep:

Drug Treatment

Antacids can help neutralize your stomach acid. They do not help to treat the irritation in your esophagus. Common side effects of antacids include diarrhea or constipation.

Other over-the-counter drugs and prescription drugs can treat GERD. They work more slowly than antacids but give you longer relief. Your provider can tell you how to take these drugs. There are two different types of these drugs:

Follow-up

You will have follow-up visits with your provider to check your esophagus. You may also need to have dental check-ups. GERD can cause the enamel on your teeth to wear away.

When to Call the Doctor

Call your provider if you have:

Related Information

Gastroesophageal reflux disease
Anti-reflux surgery
EGD - esophagogastroduodenoscopy
Anti-reflux surgery - children
Anti-reflux surgery - discharge
Taking antacids
Heartburn - what to ask your doctor
Anti-reflux surgery - children - discharge

References

Abdul-Hussein M, Castell DO. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In: Kellerman RD, Rakel DP, eds. Conn's Current Therapy 2019. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2019;208-211.

Falk GW, Katzka DA. Diseases of the esophagus. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 138.

Katz PO, Gerson LB, Vela MF. Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Am J Gastroenterol. 2013;108(3):308-328. PMID: 23419381 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23419381.

Richter JE, Friedenberg FK. Gastroesophageal reflux disease. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 44.

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Review Date: 10/31/2018  

Reviewed By: Michael M. Phillips, MD, Clinical Professor of Medicine, The George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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