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Dementia - keeping safe in the home

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Preventing falls

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Description

It is important to make sure the homes of people who have dementia are safe for them.

Safety Tips for the Home

Wandering can be a serious problem for people who have more advanced dementia. These tips may help prevent wandering:

To prevent harm when someone with dementia does wander:

Inspect the person's house and remove or reduce hazards for tripping and falling.

Do not leave a person who has advanced dementia alone at home.

Lower the temperature of the hot water tank. Remove or lock up cleaning products and other items that may be poisonous.

Make sure the kitchen is safe.

Remove, or store the following in locked areas:

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References

Alzheimer's Association website. Alzheimer's Association 2018 Dementia Care Practice Recommendations. alz.org/professionals/professional-providers/dementia_care_practice_recommendations. Accessed April 25, 2020.

Budson AE, Solomon PR. Life adjustments for memory loss, Alzheimer's disease, and dementia. In: Budson AE, Solomon PR, eds. Memory Loss, Alzheimer's Disease, and Dementia: A Practical Guide for Clinicians. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 25.

National Institute on Aging website. Home safety and Alzheimer's disease. www.nia.nih.gov/health/home-safety-and-alzheimers-disease. Updated May 18, 2017. Accessed June 15, 2020.

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Review Date: 4/25/2020  

Reviewed By: David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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