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Vaginitis test - wet mount

Wet prep - vaginitis; Vaginosis - wet mount; Trichomoniasis - wet mount; Vaginal candida - wet mount

The vaginitis wet mount test is a test to detect an infection of the vagina.

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Female reproductive anatomy
The wet mount vaginitis test
Uterus

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How the Test is Performed

This test is done in your health care provider's office.

The discharge is sent to a lab. There, it is placed onto a slide. It is then viewed under a microscope and checked for signs of infection.

How to Prepare for the Test

Follow any instructions from your provider on preparing for the test. This may include:

How the Test will Feel

There may be slight discomfort when the speculum is inserted into the vagina.

Why the Test is Performed

The test looks for the cause of vaginal irritation and discharge.

Normal Results

A normal test result means there are no signs of an infection.

Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk to your provider about the meaning of your specific test results.

What Abnormal Results Mean

Abnormal results mean there is an infection. The most common infections are due to one or a combination of the following:

Risks

There are no risks with this test.

Related Information

Vaginal dryness
Vaginal itching and discharge - adult and adolescent
Vaginal yeast infection
Trichomoniasis
Cervix

References

Eckert LO, Lentz GM. Genital tract infections: vulva, vagina, cervix, toxic shock syndrome, endometritis, and salpingitis. In: Gershenson DM, Lentz GM, Valea FA, Lobo RA, eds. Comprehensive Gynecology. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2022:chap 23.

Plourde AR, Beavis KG. Specimen collection and handling for diagnosis of infectious diseases. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods. 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2022:chap 66.

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Review Date: 6/19/2021  

Reviewed By: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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