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Tendon repair

Repair of tendon

Tendon repair is surgery to repair damaged or torn tendons.

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Tendons and muscles

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Description

Tendon repairs can often be done in an outpatient setting. Hospital stays, if any, are short.

Tendon repair can be performed using:

The surgeon makes a cut on the skin over the injured tendon. The damaged or torn ends of the tendon are sewn together.

If the tendon has been severely injured, a tendon graft may be needed.

If the tendon damage is too severe, the repair and reconstruction may have to be done at different times. The surgeon will perform one surgery to repair part of the injury. Another surgery will be done at a later time to finish repairing or reconstructing the tendon.

Why the Procedure Is Performed

The goal of tendon repair is to bring back normal function of joints or surrounding tissues a tendon injury or tear.

Risks

Risks of anesthesia and surgery in general include:

Risks of this procedure include:

Before the Procedure

Tell your surgeon what medicines you are taking. These include medicines, herbs, and supplements you bought without a prescription.

During the days before the surgery:

On the day of the surgery:

After the Procedure

Healing may take 6 to 12 weeks. During that time:

Outlook (Prognosis)

Most tendon repairs are successful with proper and continued physical therapy.

Related Information

Cuts and puncture wounds

References

Cannon DL. Flexor and extensor tendon injuries. In: Azar FM, Beaty JH, Canale ST, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics. 13th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 66.

Irwin TA. Tendon injuries of the foot and ankle. In: Miller MD, Thompson SR, eds. DeLee, Drez & Miller's Orthopaedic Sports Medicine. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 118.

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Review Date: 7/25/2020  

Reviewed By: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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