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Hemorrhoid surgery

Hemorrhoidectomy

Hemorrhoids are swollen veins around the anus. They may be inside the anus (internal hemorrhoids) or outside the anus (external hemorrhoids).

Often hemorrhoids do not cause problems. But if hemorrhoids bleed a lot, cause pain, or become swollen, hard, and painful, surgery can remove them.

Presentation

Hemorrhoid surgery  - series

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Description

Hemorrhoid surgery can be done in your health care provider's office or in the hospital operating room. In most cases, you can go home the same day. The type of surgery you have depends on your symptoms and the location and size of the hemorrhoid.

Before the surgery, your doctor will numb the area so you can stay awake, but not feel anything. For some types of surgery, you may be given general anesthesia. This means you will be given medicine in your vein that puts you to sleep and keeps you pain-free during surgery.

Hemorrhoid surgery may involve:

Why the Procedure Is Performed

Often you can manage small hemorrhoids by:

When these measures do not work and you are having bleeding and pain, your doctor may recommend hemorrhoid surgery.

Risks

Risks for anesthesia and surgery in general are:

Risks for this type of surgery include:

Before the Procedure

Be sure to tell your provider:

During the days before the surgery:

On the day of your surgery:

After the Procedure

You will usually go home the same day after your surgery. Be sure you arrange to have someone drive you home. You may have a lot of pain after surgery as the area tightens and relaxes. You may be given medicines to relieve pain.

Follow instructions on how to care for yourself at home.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Most people do very well after hemorrhoid surgery. You should recover fully in a few weeks, depending on how involved the surgery was.

You will need to continue with diet and lifestyle changes to help prevent the hemorrhoids from coming back.

Related Information

Hemorrhoids
Varicose veins
Fiber
Blood clots

References

Hyman N, Umanskiy K. Anus. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery. 21st ed. St Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2022:chap 53.

Obokhare I, Amajoyi R. Management of hemorrhoids. In: Cameron AM, Cameron JL, eds. Current Surgical Therapy. 13th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 289-295.

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Review Date: 9/19/2021  

Reviewed By: Debra G. Wechter, MD, FACS, General Surgery Practice Specializing in Breast Cancer, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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