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Vulvar cancer

Cancer - vulva; Cancer - perineum; Cancer - vulvar; Genital warts - vulvar cancer; HPV - vulvar cancer

Vulvar cancer is cancer that starts in the vulva. Vulvar cancer most often affects the labia, the folds of skin outside the vagina. In some cases, vulvar cancer starts on the clitoris or in glands on the sides of the vaginal opening.

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Female perineal anatomy

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Causes

Most vulvar cancers begin in skin cells called squamous cells. Other types of cancers found on the vulva are:

Vulvar cancer is rare. Risk factors include:

Women with a condition called vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) have a high risk of developing vulvar cancer that spreads. Most cases of VIN, though, never lead to cancer.

Other possible risk factors may include:

Symptoms

Women with this condition will often have itching around the vagina for years. They may have used different skin creams. They may also have bleeding or discharge outside their periods.

Other skin changes that may occur around the vulva:

Other symptoms:

Some women with vulvar cancer have no symptoms.

Exams and Tests

The following tests are used to diagnose vulvar cancer:

Treatment

Treatment involves surgery to remove the cancer cells. If the tumor is large (more than 2 cm) or has grown deeply into the skin, the lymph nodes in the groin area may also be removed.

Radiation, with or without chemotherapy, may be used to treat:

Support Groups

You can ease the stress of illness by joining a cancer support group. Sharing with others who have common experiences and problems can help you not feel alone.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Most women with vulvar cancer who are diagnosed and treated at an early stage do well. But a woman's outcome depends on:

The cancer commonly comes back at or near the site of the original tumor.

Possible Complications

Complications may include:

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your health care provider if you have any of these symptoms for more than 2 weeks:

Prevention

Practicing safer sex may decrease your risk for vulvar cancer. This includes using condoms to protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

A vaccine is available to protect against certain forms of HPV infection. The vaccine is approved to prevent cervical cancer and genital warts. It may help prevent other cancers linked to HPV, such as vulvar cancer. The vaccine is given to young girls before they become sexually active, and to adolescents and women up to age 45.

Routine pelvic exams can help detect vulvar cancer at an earlier stage. Earlier diagnosis improves your chances that treatment will be successful.

Related Information

Squamous cell skin cancer
Genital warts
Cancer
Cervical cancer
Vaginal cancer
Diabetes
Overweight
High blood pressure - adults

References

Frumovitz M, Bodurka DC. Neoplastic diseases of the vulva: lichen sclerosus, intraepithelial neoplasia, paget disease, and carcinoma. In: Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Lentz GM, Valea FA, eds. Comprehensive Gynecology. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 30.

Jhingran A, Russell AH, Seiden MV, et al. Cancers of the cervix, vulva, and vagina. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Kastan MB, Doroshow JH, Tepper JE, eds. Abeloff's Clinical Oncology. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 84.

Koh WJ, Greer BE, Abu-Rustum NR, et al. Vulvar cancer, Version 1.2017, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. J Natl Compr Canc Netw. 2017;15(1):92-120. PMID: 28040721 pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28040721/.

National Cancer Institute website. Vulvar cancer treatment (PDQ) - health professional version. www.cancer.gov/types/vulvar/hp/vulvar-treatment-pdq. Updated January 30, 2020. Accessed January 31, 2020.

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Review Date: 1/21/2020  

Reviewed By: Howard Goodman, MD, Gynecologic Oncology, Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, West Palm Beach, FL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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