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Neurosyphilis

Syphilis - neurosyphilis

Neurosyphilis is a bacterial infection of the brain or spinal cord. It usually occurs in people who have had untreated syphilis for many years.

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Central nervous system and peripheral nervous system
Late-stage syphilis

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Causes

Neurosyphilis is caused by Treponema pallidum. This is the bacteria that causes syphilis. Neurosyphilis usually occurs about 10 to 20 years after a person is first infected with syphilis. Not everyone who has syphilis develops this complication.

There are four different forms of neurosyphilis:

Asymptomatic neurosyphilis occurs before symptomatic syphilis. Asymptomatic means there aren't any symptoms.

Symptoms

Symptoms usually affect the nervous system. Depending on the form of neurosyphilis, symptoms may include any of the following:

Exams and Tests

Your health care provider will do a physical examination and may find the following:

Blood tests can be done to detect substances produced by the bacteria that cause syphilis, this includes:

With neurosyphilis, it is important to test the spinal fluid for signs of syphilis.

Tests to look for problems with the nervous system may include:

Treatment

The antibiotic penicillin is used to treat neurosyphilis. It can be given in different ways:

You must have follow-up blood tests at 3, 6, 12, 24, and 36 months to make sure the infection is gone. You will need follow-up lumbar punctures for CSF analysis every 6 months. If you have HIV/AIDS or another medical condition, your follow-up schedule may be different.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Neurosyphilis is a life-threatening complication of syphilis. How well you do depends on how severe the neurosyphilis is before treatment.

Possible Complications

The symptoms can slowly worsen.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your provider if you have had syphilis in the past and now have signs of nervous system problems.

Prevention

Prompt diagnosis and treatment of the original syphilis infection can prevent neurosyphilis.

Related Information

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Tabes dorsalis
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References

Berger JR, Dean D. Neurosyphilis. Handb Clin Neurol. 2014;121:1461-1472. PMID: 24365430 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24365430.

Radolf JD, Tramont EC, Salazar JC. Syphilis (Treponema pallidum). In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases, Updated Edition. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 239.

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Review Date: 12/1/2018  

Reviewed By: Jatin M. Vyas, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Assistant in Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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