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Factor X deficiency

Stuart-Prower deficiency

Factor X (ten) deficiency is a disorder caused by a lack of a protein called factor X in the blood. It leads to problems with blood clotting (coagulation).

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Blood clot formation
Blood clots

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Causes

When you bleed, a series of reactions take place in the body that helps blood clots form. This process is called the coagulation cascade. It involves special proteins called coagulation, or clotting, factors. You may have a higher chance of excess bleeding if one or more of these factors are missing or are not functioning like they should.

Factor X is one such coagulation factor. Factor X deficiency is often caused by an inherited defect in the factor X gene. This is called inherited factor X deficiency. Bleeding ranges from mild to severe depending on how severe the deficiency is.

Factor X deficiency can also be due to another condition or use of certain medicines. This is called acquired factor X deficiency. Acquired factor X deficiency is common. It can be caused by:

Women with factor X deficiency may first be diagnosed when they have very heavy menstrual bleeding and bleeding after childbirth. The condition may be first noticed in newborn boys if they have bleeding that lasts longer than normal after circumcision.

Symptoms

Symptoms may include any of the following:

Exams and Tests

Tests that may be done include:

Treatment

Bleeding can be controlled by getting intravenous (IV) infusions of plasma or concentrates of clotting factors. If you lack vitamin K, your doctor will prescribe vitamin K for you to take by mouth, through injections under the skin, or through a vein (intravenously).

If you have this bleeding disorder, be sure to:

Support Groups

These resources can provide more information on factor X deficiency:

Outlook (Prognosis)

The outcome is good if the condition is mild or you get treatment.

Inherited factor X deficiency is a lifelong condition.

The outlook for acquired factor X deficiency depends on the cause. If it is caused by liver disease, the outcome depends on how well your liver disease can be treated. Taking vitamin K supplements will treat vitamin K deficiency. If the disorder is caused by amyloidosis, there are several treatment options. Your doctor can tell you more.

Possible Complications

Severe bleeding or sudden loss of blood (hemorrhage) can occur. The joints may get deformed in severe disease from many bleeds.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Get emergency medical help if you have an unexplained or severe loss of blood.

Prevention

There is no known prevention for inherited factor X deficiency. When a lack of vitamin K is the cause, using vitamin K can help.

Related Information

Protein in diet
Primary amyloidosis
Bleeding

References

Gailani D, Wheeler AP, Neff AT. Rare coagulation factor deficiencies. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ, Silberstein LE, et al, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 137.

Hall JE. Hemostasis and blood coagulation. In: Hall JE, ed. Guyton and Hall Textbook of Medical Physiology. 13th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 37.

Ragni MV. Hemorrhagic disorders: coagulation factor deficiencies. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 174.

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Review Date: 1/29/2019  

Reviewed By: Todd Gersten, MD, Hematology/Oncology, Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Wellington, FL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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