Site Map

Epilepsy in children - what to ask your doctor

What to ask your doctor about epilepsy - child; Seizures - what to ask your doctor - child

Your child has epilepsy. Children with epilepsy have seizures. A seizure is a sudden brief change in the electrical activity in the brain. Your child may have brief periods of unconsciousness and uncontrollable body movements during seizures. Children with epilepsy can have one or more types of seizures.

Below are some questions you may want to ask your child's health care provider to help you take care of your child's epilepsy.

I Would Like to Learn About:

Questions

What safety measures do I need to take at home to keep my child safe during a seizure?

What should I discuss with my child's teachers about epilepsy?

Are there any sports activities that my child should not do? Does my child need to wear a helmet for any type of activities?

Does my child need to wear a medical alert bracelet?

Who else should know about my child's epilepsy?

Is it ever OK to leave my child alone?

What do we need to know about my child's seizure medicines?

How often does my child need to see the doctor? When does my child need blood tests?

Will I always be able to tell my child is having a seizure?

What are the signs that my child's epilepsy is becoming worse?

What should I do when my child is having a seizure?

Related Information

Epilepsy
Absence seizure
Partial (focal) seizure
Epilepsy - resources
Brain surgery
Seizures
Stereotactic radiosurgery - CyberKnife
Brain surgery - discharge
Epilepsy in children - discharge
Preventing head injuries in children

References

Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff RB, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, Pomeroy SL, eds. Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 101.

Mikati MA, Hani AJ. Seizures in childhood. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 593.

BACK TO TOP

Review Date: 3/24/2019  

Reviewed By: Alireza Minagar, MD, MBA, Professor, Department of Neurology, LSU Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

ADAM Quality Logo

A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, for Health Content Provider (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy, editorial process and privacy policy. A.D.A.M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- 2020 A.D.A.M., a business unit of Ebix, Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

A.D.A.M. content is best viewed in IE9 or above, Firefox and Google Chrome browser.