Site Map

Preventing head injuries in children

Concussion - preventing in children; Traumatic brain injury - preventing in children; TBI - children; Safety - preventing head injury

I Would Like to Learn About:

Description

Although no child is injury proof, parents can take simple steps to keep their children from getting head injuries.

Car Safety

Your child should wear a seatbelt at all times when they are in a car or other motor vehicle.

DO NOT drive with a child in your car when you have been drinking alcohol, used illegal drugs, or are feeling very tired.

Wearing a Helmet

Helmets help to prevent head injuries. Your child should wear a helmet that fits properly for the following sports or activities:

Your local sporting goods store, sports facility, or bike shop will be able to help make certain the helmet fits properly. You can also contact the American League of Bicyclists -- www.bikeleague.org.

Almost all major medical organizations recommend against boxing of any sort, even with a helmet.

Older children should always wear a helmet when riding a snowmobile, motorcycle, scooter, or all-terrain vehicle (ATV). If possible, children should not ride on these vehicles.

After having a concussion or mild head injury, your child may need a helmet. Be sure to talk with your provider about when your child can return to activities.

Keeping Your Child Safe in the Home

Install window guards on all windows that can be opened.

Use a safety gate at the top and the bottom of stairs until your child can safely go up and down. Keep stairs free of any clutter. DO NOT let your children play on stairs or jump on or from furniture.

DO NOT leave a young infant alone on a high place such as a bed or sofa. When using a high chair, make sure your child is strapped in with the safety harness.

Store all firearms and bullets in a locked cabinet.

Outdoor Safety

Make sure playground surfaces are safe. They should be made of shock-absorbing material, such as rubber mulch.

Keep your children away from trampolines, if possible.

Bed Safety

Some simple steps can keep your child safe in bed:

Related Information

Craniosynostosis repair
Unconsciousness - first aid
Head injury - first aid
Concussion
Decreased alertness
Craniosynostosis repair - discharge
Epilepsy in children - discharge
Concussion in children - what to ask your doctor
Epilepsy in children - what to ask your doctor

References

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Brain injury basics. www.cdc.gov/headsup/basics/index.html. Updated February 16, 2015. Accessed October 22, 2018.

Krach LE. Severe traumatic brain injury. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 710.

National Highway Traffic Safety Administration website. Car seats and booster seats. www.nhtsa.gov/equipment/car-seats-and-booster-seats#35091. Accessed October 22, 2018.

BACK TO TOP

Review Date: 8/5/2018  

Reviewed By: Neil K. Kaneshiro, MD, MHA, Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

ADAM Quality Logo

A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, for Health Content Provider (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy, editorial process and privacy policy. A.D.A.M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information: verify here.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- 2021 A.D.A.M., a business unit of Ebix, Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.

A.D.A.M. content is best viewed in IE9 or above, Firefox and Google Chrome browser.