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Communicating with someone with aphasia

Stroke - aphasia; Speech and language disorder - aphasia

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Description

Aphasia is loss of the ability to understand or express spoken or written language. It commonly occurs after strokes or traumatic brain injuries. It can also occur in people with brain tumors or degenerative diseases that affect the language areas of the brain.

Use the tips below for improving communication with someone who has aphasia.

What to Expect at Home

People who have aphasia have language problems. They may have trouble saying and/or writing words correctly. This type of aphasia is called expressive aphasia. People who have it may understand what another person is saying. If they do not understand what is being said, or if they cannot understand written words, they have what is called receptive aphasia. Some people have a combination of both types of aphasia.

Expressive aphasia may be non-fluent, in which case a person has trouble:

Another kind of expressive aphasia is fluent aphasia. People who have fluent aphasia may be able to put many words together. But what they say may not make sense. They are often unaware that they are not making sense.

People who have aphasia may become frustrated:

Speech and language therapists can work with people who have aphasia and their family or caregivers to improve their ability to communicate.

The most common cause of aphasia is stroke. Recovery may take up to 2 years, though not everyone fully recovers. Aphasia may also be due to the brain losing function, such as with Alzheimer disease. In such cases, aphasia will not get better.

Improving Daily Communication

There are many ways to help people with aphasia.

Keep distractions and noise down.

Talk to people who have aphasia in adult language. Do not make them feel as if they are children. Do not pretend to understand them if you do not.

If a person with aphasia cannot understand you, do not shout. Unless the person also has a hearing problem, shouting will not help. Make eye contact when talking to the person.

When you ask questions:

When you give instructions:

You can encourage the person with aphasia to use other ways to communicate, such as:

It may help a person with aphasia, as well as their caregivers, to have a book with pictures or words about common topics or people so that communication is easier.

Always try to keep people with aphasia involved in conversations. Check with them to make sure they understand. But do not push too hard for them to understand, since this may cause more frustration.

Do not try to correct people with aphasia if they remember something incorrectly.

Begin to take people with aphasia out more, as they become more confident. This will allow them to practice communicating and understanding in real-life situations.

When leaving someone with speech problems alone, make sure the person has an ID card that:

Consider joining support groups for people with aphasia and their families.

Related Information

Brain surgery
Brain aneurysm repair
Stroke
Dementia
Alzheimer disease
Dementia - behavior and sleep problems
Dementia - daily care
Dementia - keeping safe in the home
Brain surgery - discharge
Dementia and driving
Communicating with someone with dysarthria
Brain aneurysm repair - discharge
Stroke - discharge
Dementia - what to ask your doctor

References

Dobkin BH. Rehabilitation and recovery of the patient with stroke. In: Grotta JC, Albers GW, Broderick JP, et al, eds. Stroke: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, and Management. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 58.

Kirschner HS. Aphasia and aphasic syndromes. In: Daroff RB, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, Pomeroy SL, eds. Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 13.

Page S. Guide to living with aphasia. Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2013;94(8):1643-1644. PMID: 24049797 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24049797.

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Review Date: 4/30/2018  

Reviewed By: Amit M. Shelat, DO, FACP, Attending Neurologist and Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurology, SUNY Stony Brook, School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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