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Hyperactivity

Activity - increased; Hyperkinetic behavior

Hyperactivity means having increased movement, impulsive actions, and a shorter attention span, and being easily distracted.

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Central nervous system and peripheral nervous system

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Considerations

Hyperactive behavior usually refers to constant activity, being easily distracted, impulsiveness, inability to concentrate, aggressiveness, and similar behaviors.

Typical behaviors may include:

Hyperactivity is not easily defined. It often depends on the observer. Behavior that seems excessive to one person may not seem excessive to another. But certain children, when compared to others, are clearly far more active. This can become a problem if it interferes with school work or making friends.

Hyperactivity is often considered more of a problem for schools and parents than it is for the child. But many hyperactive children are unhappy, or even depressed. Hyperactive behavior may make a child a target for bullying, or make it harder to connect with other children. Schoolwork may be more difficult. Kids who are hyperactive are frequently punished for their behavior.

Excessive movement (hyperkinetic behavior) often decreases as the child grows older. It may disappear entirely by adolescence.

Causes

Conditions that may lead to hyperactivity include:

Home Care

A child who is normally very active often responds well to specific directions and a program of regular physical activity. But, a child with a ADHD has a hard time following directions and controlling impulses.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your child's health care provider if:

What to Expect at Your Office Visit

The provider will perform a physical exam of your child and ask about your child's symptoms and medical history. Examples of questions include whether the behavior is new, if your child has always been very active, and whether the behavior is getting worse.

The provider may recommend a psychological evaluation. There may also be a review of the home and school environments.

Related Information

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

References

Feldman HM, Chaves-Gnecco D. Developmental/behavioral pediatrics. In: Zitelli BJ, McIntire SC, Nowalk AJ, eds. Zitelli and Davis' Atlas of Pediatric Physical Diagnosis. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 3.

Morrow C. Psychiatry. In: Kleinman K, Mcdaniel L, Molloy M, eds. The Harriet Lane Handbook. 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2021:chap 24.

Urion DK. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. In: Kliegman RM, St. Geme JW, Blum NJ, Shah SS, Tasker RC, Wilson KM, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 21st ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 49.

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Review Date: 5/27/2020  

Reviewed By: Neil K. Kaneshiro, MD, MHA, Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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