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Muscle function loss

Paralysis; Paresis; Loss of movement; Motor dysfunction

Muscle function loss is when a muscle does not work or move normally. The medical term for complete loss of muscle function is paralysis.

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Superficial anterior muscles
Deep anterior muscles
Tendons and muscles
Lower leg muscles

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Considerations

Loss of muscle function may be caused by:

The loss of muscle function after these types of events can be severe. In some cases, muscle strength may not completely return, even with treatment.

Paralysis can be temporary or permanent. It can affect a small area (localized or focal) or be widespread (generalized). It may affect one side (unilateral) or both sides (bilateral).

If the paralysis affects the lower half of the body and both legs it is called paraplegia. If it affects both arms and legs, it is called quadriplegia. If the paralysis affects the muscles that cause breathing, it is quickly life-threatening.

Causes

Diseases of the muscles that cause muscle-function loss include:

Diseases of the nervous system that cause muscle function loss include:

Home Care

Sudden loss of muscle function is a medical emergency. Get medical help right away.

After you have received medical treatment, your health care provider may recommend some of the following measures:

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Muscle paralysis always requires immediate medical attention. If you notice gradual weakening or problems with a muscle, get medical attention as soon as possible.

What to Expect at Your Office Visit

The doctor will perform a physical exam and ask questions about your medical history and symptoms, including:

Location:

Symptoms:

Time pattern:

Aggravating and relieving factors:

Tests that may be performed include:

Intravenous feeding or feeding tubes may be required in severe cases. Physical therapy, occupational therapy, or speech therapy may be recommended.

Related Information

Muscle cramps
Stroke
Broken bone
Polio
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)
Botulism
Poisoning - fish and shellfish
Guillain-Barré syndrome

References

Griggs RC, Jozefowicz RF, Aminoff MJ. Approach to the patient with neurologic disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 396.

Selcen D. Muscle diseases. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 421.

Warner WC, Sawyer JR. Neuromuscular disorders. In: Azar FM, Beaty JH, Canale ST, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics. 13th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 35.

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Review Date: 2/27/2018  

Reviewed By: Joseph V. Campellone, MD, Department of Neurology, Cooper Medical School at Rowan University, Camden, NJ. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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