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Delirium

Acute confusional state; Acute brain syndrome

Delirium is sudden severe confusion due to rapid changes in brain function that occur with physical or mental illness.

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Central nervous system and peripheral nervous system
Brain

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Causes

Delirium is most often caused by physical or mental illness and is usually temporary and reversible. Many disorders cause delirium. Often, these do not allow the brain to get oxygen or other substances. They may also cause dangerous chemicals (toxins) to build up in the brain. Delirium is common in the intensive care unit (ICU), especially in older adults.

Causes include:

Symptoms

Delirium involves a quick change between mental states (for example, from lethargy to agitation and back to lethargy).

Symptoms include:

Exams and Tests

The following tests may have abnormal results:

The following tests may also be done:

Treatment

The goal of treatment is to control or reverse the cause of the symptoms. Treatment depends on the condition causing delirium. The person may need to stay in the hospital for a short time.

Stopping or changing medicines that worsen confusion, or that are not necessary, may improve mental function.

Disorders that contribute to confusion should be treated. These may include:

Treating medical and mental disorders often greatly improves mental function.

Medicines may be needed to control aggressive or agitated behaviors. These are usually started at very low dosages and adjusted as needed.

Some people with delirium may benefit from hearing aids, glasses, or cataract surgery.

Other treatments that may be helpful:

Outlook (Prognosis)

Acute conditions that cause delirium may occur with long-term (chronic) disorders that cause dementia. Acute brain syndromes may be reversible by treating the cause.

Delirium often lasts about 1 week. It may take several weeks for mental function to return to normal. Full recovery is common, but depends on the underlying cause of the delirium.

Possible Complications

Problems that may result from delirium include:

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your health care provider if there is a rapid change in mental status.

Prevention

Treating the conditions that cause delirium can reduce its risk. In hospitalized people, avoiding or using a low dosage of sedatives, prompt treatment of metabolic disorders and infections, and using reality orientation programs will reduce the risk of delirium in those at high risk.

Related Information

Confusion
Acute
Electrolytes
Decreased alertness

References

Guthrie PF, Rayborn S, Butcher HK. Evidence-based practice guideline: delirium. J Gerontol Nurs. 2018;44(2):14-24. PMID: 29378075 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29378075.

Inouye SK. Delirium in the older patient. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 26th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2020:chap 25.

Mendez MF, Padilla CR. Delirium. In: Daroff RB, Jankovic J, Mazziotta JC, Pomeroy SL, eds. Bradley's Neurology in Clinical Practice. 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 4.

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Review Date: 9/17/2019  

Reviewed By: Alireza Minagar, MD, MBA, Professor, Department of Neurology, LSU Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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